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New Mac Mini

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Big things in a small package

Introducing Apple’s new M1 chip

The Mac Mini is back, and this time, it’s got something different on the inside. This is one of the first Macs to run on Apple’s newest M1 CPU, its first chipset specifically designed for the company’s computers. M1 is special because it’s an ARM-based system on a chip (SoC) that should help the Mini run with greater efficiency and up to 3x faster.

M1 uses the ARM architecture the iPad and iPhone already run on, except it also integrates the GPU, Neural Engine, I/O and other important components to make it the beast it is. The 8-core CPU gives this new Mini a head start in any race against its predecessor. It can run up to 3x faster than the previous Mini, just like the 8-core GPU takes graphics-intensive tasks to as much as a 6x increase in performance. Past Mac Minis ran on Intel processors with the same x86 architecture Windows PCs have also used for a long time.

There is a lot going on under the Mini’s small hood. Despite the extra performance going on underneath, the box is still no bigger than it was before. And the ARM-based chipset aligns the computer with the iPad and iPhone. The new Mac Mini will soon be able to run iOS or iPadOS apps, or at least desktop versions of those apps made by their developers.

How the new Mac Mini will work with other Macs

ARM and x86 are technically different in just about every way, so apps between them don’t work without some help. Apple addressed the issue by building a compatibility layer called Rosetta 2 to make the conversion easier. When you want to transfer an app or game from an Intel-based Mac over to the new Mini, it can automatically convert it to work on the ARM architecture after installation.

This isn’t going to be the permanent solution once the developers of those apps and games make ARM-based versions to work more seamlessly off the new M1 chip. That includes greater power efficiency to go with the performance increases for less noise from the fan, and more sound from whatever task you’re undertaking.

A workhorse ready to start

Don’t let the Mini’s small size deceive you. This is a powerful machine capable of doing a lot with the right setup. While it doesn’t come with a screen of its own, it can simultaneously connect with up to two displays at once, thanks to support for both Thunderbolt and HDMI 2.0. It also has a native DisplayPort output via USB-C, plus two USB-A 3.1 ports to connect peripherals and external drives.

Connect it to the Internet through the included Ethernet port to reduce all latency, or deploy it where it’s convenient by connecting to a fast Wi-Fi 6 router. Plug in a pair of headphones or speakers through the 3.5mm audio jack, or pair wireless headphones using Bluetooth 5.0.

You can always attach external storage if space runs low, but you also have a choice between 256GB or 512GB of internal storage. Use Apple’s own Magic Keyboard and Magic Mouse 2 or Trackpad 2, or connect with your own preferred items. Mac Mini won’t mind because it’s compatible with third-party peripherals as well.

A creator’s box of tricks

Apple built the new Mini to be versatile with its performance. The new M1 chip should be strong enough to handle intensive tasks, like photo/video editing, gaming, music recording and graphics or animation. The 7.7-inch wide frame of the Mac Mini can handle it, especially when the apps are optimized for ARM.

With productivity in mind, be it for business, school or personal pursuits, the efficiency and speed of the new chip should stand out over time. As more apps make the transition to work with Apple’s newest silicon creation, the Mini will only get better at doing the things you need it to do.

Big things in a small package

Introducing Apple’s new M1 chip

The Mac Mini is back, and this time, it’s got something different on the inside. This is one of the first Macs to run on Apple’s newest M1 CPU, its first chipset specifically designed for the company’s computers. M1 is special because it’s an ARM-based system on a chip (SoC) that should help the Mini run with greater efficiency and up to 3x faster.

M1 uses the ARM architecture the iPad and iPhone already run on, except it also integrates the GPU, Neural Engine, I/O and other important components to make it the beast it is. The 8-core CPU gives this new Mini a head start in any race against its predecessor. It can run up to 3x faster than the previous Mini, just like the 8-core GPU takes graphics-intensive tasks to as much as a 6x increase in performance. Past Mac Minis ran on Intel processors with the same x86 architecture Windows PCs have also used for a long time.

There is a lot going on under the Mini’s small hood. Despite the extra performance going on underneath, the box is still no bigger than it was before. And the ARM-based chipset aligns the computer with the iPad and iPhone. The new Mac Mini will soon be able to run iOS or iPadOS apps, or at least desktop versions of those apps made by their developers.

How the new Mac Mini will work with other Macs

ARM and x86 are technically different in just about every way, so apps between them don’t work without some help. Apple addressed the issue by building a compatibility layer called Rosetta 2 to make the conversion easier. When you want to transfer an app or game from an Intel-based Mac over to the new Mini, it can automatically convert it to work on the ARM architecture after installation.

This isn’t going to be the permanent solution once the developers of those apps and games make ARM-based versions to work more seamlessly off the new M1 chip. That includes greater power efficiency to go with the performance increases for less noise from the fan, and more sound from whatever task you’re undertaking.

A workhorse ready to start

Don’t let the Mini’s small size deceive you. This is a powerful machine capable of doing a lot with the right setup. While it doesn’t come with a screen of its own, it can simultaneously connect with up to two displays at once, thanks to support for both Thunderbolt and HDMI 2.0. It also has a native DisplayPort output via USB-C, plus two USB-A 3.1 ports to connect peripherals and external drives.

Connect it to the Internet through the included Ethernet port to reduce all latency, or deploy it where it’s convenient by connecting to a fast Wi-Fi 6 router. Plug in a pair of headphones or speakers through the 3.5mm audio jack, or pair wireless headphones using Bluetooth 5.0.

You can always attach external storage if space runs low, but you also have a choice between 256GB or 512GB of internal storage. Use Apple’s own Magic Keyboard and Magic Mouse 2 or Trackpad 2, or connect with your own preferred items. Mac Mini won’t mind because it’s compatible with third-party peripherals as well.

A creator’s box of tricks

Apple built the new Mini to be versatile with its performance. The new M1 chip should be strong enough to handle intensive tasks, like photo/video editing, gaming, music recording and graphics or animation. The 7.7-inch wide frame of the Mac Mini can handle it, especially when the apps are optimized for ARM.

With productivity in mind, be it for business, school or personal pursuits, the efficiency and speed of the new chip should stand out over time. As more apps make the transition to work with Apple’s newest silicon creation, the Mini will only get better at doing the things you need it to do.