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Chest Freezers

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Stores tons of frozen foods in a chest freezer

What is a chest freezer and how is it different from an upright freezer?

A chest freezer can store large quantities of food for months, even years. Short and wide, they have big, open interior spaces. Some newer models include bins and drawers for neater storage and organization, so you don’t have to dig through items to find what you need. They’re great for a basement, garage, or large kitchen where you have the floor space to accommodate one.

An upright freezer is similar, though they are narrower and taller, resembling actual refrigerators, making them better for smaller spaces. But chest freezers are typically cheaper, and more energy efficient.

Usually finished in white, sizes range from a small chest freezer of 3.5 cubic feet up to a very deep chest freezer as large as 24.8 cubic feet.

What are the best foods to store in a chest freezer?

You can store pretty much anything in a chest freezer, from sealed fresh meats, to vegetables, fruits, frozen dinners, ice cream, boxed pizzas, and more.

Since chest freezers aren’t opened as often as refrigerators, store items that you want to preserve for long periods of time, like big batches of soups or sauces, homemade lasagna stored in individual serving containers, meat you’ve butchered and cut up, homemade baby food, bread, and more.

You’ll want to store a lot of the same foods that you can easily stack, like boxed dinners; and try to use stackable storage containers or vacuum-sealed bags. This will help ensure longer food preservation and reduce cross-contamination, so you don’t have ill-packaged frozen meats beside ice cream and popsicles.

What to consider when choosing a chest freezer?

Chest freezers need to be manually defrosted at least once a year. This requires removing all food and placing it safely in another freezer or coolers, unplugging the freezer and opening the lid, and attaching one end of a hose to the freezer’s drain and the other to a drain or bucket to collect the water. You might also need to scrape off large blocks of ice.

Those with mobility issues or who are particularly short shouldn’t get one that’s too deep as you might have difficulty bending over to retrieve items, and for cleaning.

If it will be in a big, open space, like an unfinished basement, go for the largest you can fit. For common areas, look for something sleeker and smaller that won’t stick out like a sore thumb. Consider the operating temperature if you’ll put it in a garage and live where well-below-zero frigid temperatures are common in the winter and/or it gets really hot and humid in the summer. Some models have external temperature controls.

If you plan to store lots of different types of food, look for a chest freezer with adjustable and removable bins for storing small items up top, or shelving for better organization. Other useful features include interior lighting and key locks for safety

Stores tons of frozen foods in a chest freezer

What is a chest freezer and how is it different from an upright freezer?

A chest freezer can store large quantities of food for months, even years. Short and wide, they have big, open interior spaces. Some newer models include bins and drawers for neater storage and organization, so you don’t have to dig through items to find what you need. They’re great for a basement, garage, or large kitchen where you have the floor space to accommodate one.

An upright freezer is similar, though they are narrower and taller, resembling actual refrigerators, making them better for smaller spaces. But chest freezers are typically cheaper, and more energy efficient.

Usually finished in white, sizes range from a small chest freezer of 3.5 cubic feet up to a very deep chest freezer as large as 24.8 cubic feet.

What are the best foods to store in a chest freezer?

You can store pretty much anything in a chest freezer, from sealed fresh meats, to vegetables, fruits, frozen dinners, ice cream, boxed pizzas, and more.

Since chest freezers aren’t opened as often as refrigerators, store items that you want to preserve for long periods of time, like big batches of soups or sauces, homemade lasagna stored in individual serving containers, meat you’ve butchered and cut up, homemade baby food, bread, and more.

You’ll want to store a lot of the same foods that you can easily stack, like boxed dinners; and try to use stackable storage containers or vacuum-sealed bags. This will help ensure longer food preservation and reduce cross-contamination, so you don’t have ill-packaged frozen meats beside ice cream and popsicles.

What to consider when choosing a chest freezer?

Chest freezers need to be manually defrosted at least once a year. This requires removing all food and placing it safely in another freezer or coolers, unplugging the freezer and opening the lid, and attaching one end of a hose to the freezer’s drain and the other to a drain or bucket to collect the water. You might also need to scrape off large blocks of ice.

Those with mobility issues or who are particularly short shouldn’t get one that’s too deep as you might have difficulty bending over to retrieve items, and for cleaning.

If it will be in a big, open space, like an unfinished basement, go for the largest you can fit. For common areas, look for something sleeker and smaller that won’t stick out like a sore thumb. Consider the operating temperature if you’ll put it in a garage and live where well-below-zero frigid temperatures are common in the winter and/or it gets really hot and humid in the summer. Some models have external temperature controls.

If you plan to store lots of different types of food, look for a chest freezer with adjustable and removable bins for storing small items up top, or shelving for better organization. Other useful features include interior lighting and key locks for safety